Rachel Grant

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“I passionately believe that survivors do not have to remain trapped or confronted daily by the thoughts or behaviors that result from abuse. Through my own journey of recovery from sexual abuse, I have gained insight and understanding about what it takes to overcome abuse. This makes it possible for me to relate to and appreciate my clients’ struggles intimately. Based on my desire to foster community, intimacy and connection, I have dedicated much of my time to understanding relationships, communication and recovery. For me, how we relate to others is crucial to improving the overall quality of our lives.”

Contact Information:

Email: coach@rachelgrantcoaching.com | Phone: 415-513-0700 | Website: www.rachelgrantcoaching.com | Practice Location: San Francisco, CA 

Practice Information

About Rachel Grant

Rachel Grant is the owner and founder of Rachel Grant Coaching and is a Sexual Abuse Recovery Coach. She works with survivors of childhood sexual abuse who are beyond sick and tired of feeling broken, unfixable, and burdened by the past. She helps them let go of the pain of abuse and finally feel normal. She is also the author of Beyond Surviving: The Final Stage in Recovery from Sexual Abuse.

Rachel holds an M.A. in Counseling Psychology. She provides a compassionate and challenging approach for her clients while using coaching as opposed to therapeutic models. She is a member of the International Coach Federation & San Francisco Coaches.

Experience Working with Survivors

I work with my trauma recovery clients one-on-one on the telephone or via live video coaching over Skype™ to help them understand how abuse has impacted their thinking and behavior. Clients learn clear strategies for transforming their thoughts and develop action-oriented plans to make changes in their lives that are measurable and sustainable. I incorporate lessons learned from my own experiences & training to guide clients through the recovery process. In addition to the lessons I have learned along the way, I have attended various lectures and trainings to further hone my skills for working with clients in these areas.

My Interest in Working with Survivors of Sexual Violence

Through my own journey of recovery from sexual abuse, I have gained insight and understanding about what it takes to overcome abuse. This makes it possible for me to relate to and appreciate my clients’ struggles intimately. Based on my desire to foster community, intimacy and connection, I have dedicated much of my time to understanding relationships, communication and recovery.

Treatment Modality

I hold an M.A. in Counseling Psychology. With this training in human behavior and cognitive development, I provide a compassionate and challenging approach for my clients while using coaching as opposed to therapeutic models. Much of my work is grounded in cognitive behavioral techniques, neurology, and positive psychology.

The philosophy behind my Beyond Surviving program is that in the world of recovery, there has been a shift from using the word “victim” to “survivor” when describing those who have been abused. This shift shows up in all areas of abuse: domestic violence, rape, sexual abuse, and physical abuse. This new label was chosen in order to convey strength, to empower, and to embolden us as we begin the journey of recovery. The intent was also to distinguish between the moment of the abuse (victim) and that of the present existence and experience (survivor).

Moving from victim to survivor is an important step in recovery. During this phase, we reflect upon the experience, actively engage in facing and owning what happened, and recognize the connections between the abuse and the way we feel, think, or behave. However, this recognition and sense of empowerment is not enough. While “survivor” is a much better label than “victim,” it does not go far enough in framing an identity that leads to a thriving and powerful life.

Imagine with me for a moment that our abuse experience has left a scrape on our knee, like one we might get by falling down on a concrete sidewalk. This scrape, for many of us, remains unhealed for years and years. At times, we may bandage and tend to the wound, but we never fully recover. Worse, we come to believe it never can be healed. Now, in the case of a scrape, the skin does eventually heal and leave a scar. We look at our knee, see the scar, and remember that day when we were wounded. Yet we do not feel all of the pain or other emotions that occurred at the moment we were hurt. Nor do we continue to compensate for the wound by changing our behavior, such as not fully bending our knee for fear of reopening the wound.

I strongly believe that the wounds of abuse can be healed and looked backed upon in this same way. We can see the scar that was created, but do not feel the pain, need to compensate for, or constantly re-bandage the wound. However, this requires another shift, from survivor to beyond surviving. For that reason, I use the term “beyond survivor” to describe myself, and it is my hope that you will come to describe yourself this way as well.

With this simple shift in language and labeling, the objectives and goals of recovery shift as well. My aim is to support clients in reaching a place where they no longer feel it is necessary to manage behaviors or cope with thoughts and feelings that have resulted from abuse. Rather, they will gain insights and skills that make it possible for them to live an abundant, powerful life that is no longer mired in the past. They will see the scar, but will no longer feel wounded.

Modifications for Survivors

My program is highly accessible since it is offered via phone and Skype. I have many international and non-local clients. I have developed my program with an eye towards safety and confidentiality, so I believe the systems are already in place to ensure the safety of all participants.

Payment Options

I am able to a offer sliding-scale.

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